• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

You need a strong ARM to help you lift your AR program

icon-tools.jpgManaging relationships with your IT Industry Analysts is not unlike salespeople managing their customer relationships. Therefore it is surprising that so many AR teams do not employ a CRM-style system tailored to analysts. An Analyst Relationship Manager (ARM) system can greatly improve group collaboration and efficiency while maintaining a corporate history of analyst interactions. A survey of AR teams can turn up processes that use spreadsheets, small databases, paper files, or modified sales contact systems. Record keeping and group collaboration may take the form of shared file spaces and extended email threads. These piecemeal attempts generally do not translate into efficient use of time and team members are inclined to bypass activities seen as busy work.AR teams, like all parts of the organization, are not static. As team members come and go they can often take the analyst relationships with them. Without an accessible history new members must research the analyst perceptions, determine their briefing history, find information on events and activities, and solicit executive involvement. This can translate into a lot of work before the actual relationship building can begin.

An integrated ARM can assist both the current and the new team members by providing an organized approach to record keeping and a constant maintenance of the corporate memory.

A good ARM has several characteristics:

  • A database of analysts that maintains contact information; areas of coverage; biographies and analyst background information; links to publications, research, and quotes; and a repository for private and personal added information.
  • A method for categorizing and recording interactions with analysts quickly and easily
  • The ability to easily share analyst information among teams members
  • Automated processes for common AR activities such as sending group emails
  • Project and process management tools that integrate with standard office applications
  • Reporting capabilities and filters that create meaningful metrics
  • And most importantly, a user interface that makes the tool painless to use.

Homebrew systems, or sales systems shoehorned into AR can provide some value, but the key to team success is getting all team members to actively participate. When team members obtain more value than the effort expended they will be happy to use an efficient system.

Bottom Line: An Analyst Relationship Management system is a critical tool for even the smallest AR Teams. It can significantly improve the team effectiveness and assist in changing analyst perceptions. It also ensures that a corporate memory of analyst interactions will be maintained despite team changes.

Questions: Vendors – Do you currently use an ARM? If so, what are you using? How successfully has it been? Analysts -Do vendors appear to maintain good record keeping, respond to your requests, and have consistency among team members?

Shameless marketing pitch – If you need advice about how to select and use an ARM, check out SageCircle’s two-hour and five-hour advisory paks or Annual Advisory Service. The advisory paks are easy to setup and pay for via credit card. We can help you evaluate products and processes. Because Dave and Carter ran the largest deployment of ARchitect3 for more than three years, we can provide expert advice on how to incorporate an ARM into your AR program’s toolkit. For more information, visit our website or contact us at “sales [at] sagecircle dot com” or 650-274-8309.

3 Responses

  1. […] Corporate AR team. We were daily and heavy users of this analyst relationship management (ARM, see You need a strong ARM to help you lift your AR program) tool and found ways to incorporate the use of ARchitect in conjunction with the AR best practices […]

  2. […] review your interactions database (see You need a strong ARM to help you lift your ARprogram) to ensure that you are interacting with each tier of analyst at the appropriate […]

  3. […] review your interactions database (see You need a strong ARM to help you lift your AR program) to ensure that you are interacting with each tier of analyst at the appropriate […]

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