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IDC’s Henry Morris on three things AR teams should be doing to be more effective

photo-idc-henry-morris-final.jpgSageCircle’s Dave Eckert and Carter Lusher recently spoke with IDC’s Henry Morris, SVP, in charge of Integration, Development & Applications Strategies (IDeAS) Solutions Research and Services Research. The occasion was last Wednesday’s IDC “Software Predictions 2008 – Beyond Consolidation” breakfast briefing in Burlingame, California. Of course we had to ask Henry a question about how vendor AR teams can be more effective. Dr. Morris did not disappoint with three good suggestions:

#1 – With all the consolidation happening in the software market there are more and more “super vendors” that have quite broad product portfolios. What is starting to worry Henry is that vendors are trying to have mega analyst events where every analyst has to listen to every spokesperson regardless of relevance. Henry would prefer more targeted events or only a few main tent sessions with many breakout tracks.

#2 – Earlier briefings about upcoming announcements. Too many vendors brief analysts only a couple weeks in advance when everything is set in stone. With enough notice the analysts can provide feedback that might be acted upon to improve the announcement. (see the posting Analysts can be a great sounding board for your PR campaigns)

#3 – When scheduling analyst events skip the fancy, but inconveniently located resorts.  Most analysts travel so much that they are no longer impressed by fancy resorts. What they appreciate are vendors that are considerate of their time and energy by making events convenient. Select event locations close to airports and consider flight timing when setting the agenda.

SageCircle Technique: AR teams should frequently ask analysts how they could be more effective in working with them. This is a great relationship builder as analysts appreciate being asked about their preferences.

Bottom Line: AR teams that become more aware of analyst preferences can be more effective in educating them. It is relatively easy for AR teams to ask about preferences and then synthesize them into AR processes and practices.

Question: AR teams – Have you ever asked analysts about their preferences? Where the answers from analysts reasonable or outrageous?  Analysts – What are your suggestions for how AR teams can be more effective?
 
Are you balancing efficiency, effectiveness, style and convenience in your interactions? SageCircle can help. Our strategists can:

  • Provide on-site or distance learning sessions to get AR teams up to speed on best practices.
  • Review your recent interactions to determine how you might have been a bit more analyst centric.
  • Critique your plans for analyst events, like conferences, to ensure that flash does not overwhelm effectiveness and convenience.
  • Act as a sounding board as you brainstorm the mix of interactions for the second half of the year.

To learn more contact us at info [at] sagecircle dot com or 650-274-8309.  

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