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Pet peeve – reporters who refer to analyst firms as consultancies

icon-the-press-110w.jpgI guess I am just a nit picker, but it always catches my eye when reporters refer to Gartner, Forrester, et cetera as consultants or consultancies. The analysts’ business and research models are typically quite different from consultants. Best to refer to analyst firms as “research and advisory firm” or “market researcher.”

Also catching my eye is when a reporter refers to Gartner, Inc. as Gartner Group. Geez, it changed its name back in January 2001, get with the program.

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3 Responses

  1. This is more of a habit with some outlets than others — most use appropriate terms IMHO. That being said, some of the firms are all of the above – researchers, advisors and consultants.

    The Webster’s definition of a “consultant” is: a person who gives professional or expert advice: (example) a consultant on business methods.

    This certainly is a function — to a degree — of many firms, or specific analysts at those firms.

    One pet peeve I have is when reporters don’t use correct titles — for example, you often see in print “… said Martin Reynolds, an analyst at Gartner…” or “According to Rob Enderle, an analyst with Enderle Group…” etc.

    WRT use of the term “Gartner Group” instead of “Gartner, Inc.” or just plain “Gartner” … some habits die hard.

    –Gerry

  2. If you consider Robin Bloor’s recent post on “What Do Analysts Do?” (http://havemacwillblog.com/2008/02/04/how-to-deal-with-analysts-4-what-do-analysts-do/), there’s quite a bit of overlap between what would fall under a consultant label versus an analyst label. I’ve done many of the activities on that list while wearing a consultant’s hat, but as my activities broaden, I find myself self-identifying more as an analyst. Many independents like myself, or small firms, have a foot in both camps, so the particular title applied can be a bit subjective.

  3. Hi Gerry and Sandy,

    Thanks for the comments. Like I said a pet peeve. ;->

    However, both your comments illustrate how titles are not clear cut as they use to be… if they ever were.

    In the context of this particular post, I’m referring to those individuals, typically at major firms, with the general job description of “analyst.”

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