• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

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    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

    Unmaking fruit salad: 6 ways to help analysts segment markets

    Unmaking fruit salad: 6 ways to help analysts segment markets

     It’s a common challenge for providers: some new or fast-changing market contains very different solutions. Clients want either apples or oranges, but the analyst research reads more like fruit salad. As new solutions come into old markets, or as analysts try to squeeze hot new solutions into their less-exciting coverage areas, it’s increasingly hard for users of analyst research to make […]

    Control in Analyst Attitude Surveys

    Control in Analyst Attitude Surveys

    Because a lot of analysts take part in our Analyst Attitude Surveys, we are able to offer clients what we call a control group. In the language of research, a control group is a group of people who don’t get the treatment that we want to measure the effectiveness of. For example, most firms might be focussed on a top tier […]

    Time for a new direction in AR measurement?

    Time for a new direction in AR measurement?

    Worldwide, Analyst Relations teams are committed to fostering the best information exchange, experiences and trusted relationships with tightly-targetted global industry analysts and influencers. Sometimes the targeting is too narrow and analysts are treated inhumanly. However, the technology buying process is transforming and so must the benchmarking of analyst relationships. There’s already a long-term transformation of analyst relations. Over one-third of technology […]

Examples of analysts using blogs for research purposes

icon-social-media-blue.jpgAs we pointed out, analysts are increasingly using blogs as research development platforms so monitoring analyst blogs is a good way for analyst relations (AR) to get insights into analysts’ work-in-progress. With this information in hand, AR teams can then decide whether to join the conversation online or reach out to the analysts for a briefing or inquiry.

 Because relatively few AR teams are monitoring analyst blogs, those AR professionals that use this technique can achieve a competitive advantage by getting in early on developing ideas when they can have the most impact.

 Here are two recent examples of analysts using their blogs as research tools:

Forrester’s Jeremiah Owyang on his “Web Strategy by Jeremiah” blog announced Forrester Underway to Catalog the White Label Social Networking Space. Because the white label social networking tools market is exploding with many small vendors, it is the type of market that analysts have trouble cataloging. Here Jeremiah uses his visibility to alert vendors about the catalog project and generate entries that the Forrester team might not have found on their own.

IDC’s Rachel Happe is using her “The Social Organization” Community Velocity: A Metric for Measurement post to get feedback on a framework she is working on. Another excellent use of a blog as a research tool because in will include non-IDC clients as contributors.

It is interesting to note that both of these blogs are under the analysts’ personal brands, not their firms’ brands.

SageCircle Technique

  • Ask the analysts on your analyst list whether they have a blog, firm branded or personal, where they develop new research ideas
  • Add any new blogs to your RSS feed
  • Set up a process where AR team members are regularly checking on the analyst blogs
  • Develop a decision framework when to leave a comment on the blog versus arranging for a formal briefing… or both
  • Develop a process for contributing ideas, customer stories, data points and so on to analysts via comments on their blogs
  • Create a team of domain experts that are available to quickly contribute comments to analyst blogs. Train the team on the best practices for comments
  • Add analyst blog content into your opinion monitoring and AR metrics programs

Bottom Line: Because there are relatively few analysts in any particular market that actively blog, adding blogs to the AR team’s responsibilities will not add much work to the already busy workday. The benefits of being involved early in the development of new research offer a significant payback for a modest amount of monitoring.

Question: AR teams – Why don’t you read the relevant analysts’ blogs?

 

2 Responses

  1. I use Twitter too, it’s not just blogs. Social media is great for getting a ‘survey of the land’. I can easily find out common opinions, find all the players in the space, or get a broad spectrum of ideas.

    Unfortunately, blogs and twitter don’t go “deep” so the analyst is expected to dig further.

    I’d estimate that using my blog and twitter saves me hours and hours of time, although I still am required to dig in deeper to find out the true nuggets that turn into insight.

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