• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

Do your analysis before deciding to use social media like blogs or wikis

icon-social-media-blue.jpgBarbara French left an interesting question on SageCircle announces the Analyst Relations Wiki*, a tool to help AR teams be more efficient and effective. Basically, she asked why use a wiki instead of deploying more efficient PDF search technology on the existing PDFs?

We picked the wiki technology, because it became the logical choice after we did an analysis of the situation using the POST framework from Forrester’s Groundswell research: People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology. This same analysis process is valuable to AR teams for their own decision making.  Here is an overly simplified summary of our extensive analysis in making our choice:

  • People – AR managers are strapped for time. They have different levels of experience and as a consequence need access to different levels of information. They also have different levels of on-line sophistication.
  • Objectives – Save AR managers time and make them more effective by providing an efficient and easy-to-use interface to get best practices, templates, checklists and other tools based on SageCircle’s extensive and growing library of intellectual property.
  • Strategy – Consolidate IP currently residing in disparate formats (e.g., blog entries, Word, PDF, Excel, JPEG, and PowerPoint) into a repository that ensures easy access and the ability to better organize, add and refresh content while enhancing version control.
  • Technology – After analyzing all the choices we decided that a Web 2.0-based tool was best suited to provide us with the functionality we needed

One of the big advantages of the wiki over a collection of PDFs is that we can easily embed templates and checklists in the best practice for “at your fingertips” download. This really supports the objective of saving the AR manager time and effort.

In addition to providing a platform for our content, using a wiki has also given us the chance to develop real world experience with this technology that we can now share with our clients. Nothing replaces rolling up your sleeves and developing a paid service based on new technology. I can guarantee you that we made many a false start and mistake as we labored to understand how to use this new fangled platform.

Wiki technology can be used by AR teams as an internal repository, as a collaborative environment, or as a way to distribute information externally,   Should a client decide to explore using a wiki as a way of delivering information to industry analysts, we will now be able to help them do so quickly and efficiently.

Bottom Line: The decision to use a wiki as a content delivery was made based on a POST analysis of the situation. AR managers considering the use of any social media, even a blog, need to carefully evaluate their objectives and what they need to accomplish before picking a tool to deploy.

* Interested in learning more about the SageCircle AR Wiki and how it can save you time and make you more effective? Send an email to info [at] sagecircle dot com to arrange for a call and demo of this groundbreaking new tool for AR managers.

 

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