• Recent Posts: Kea's research blog

    ‘Influencer relations’ is no longer the best term for B2B relationship marketing

    ‘Influencer relations’ is no longer the best term for B2B relationship marketingWhen our blog changed its name from Analyst Equity to Influencer Relations, we did so to reflect the two-fold role that analyst relations established in integrating communications: enabling relationships with similar business-to-business (B2B) influencers, sourcing advisors and consultants; and developing messages and materials that enable internal capacities like sales, marketing insight and marketing. Many B2B Read more about ‘Influencer relations’ is no longer the best term for B2B relationship marketing[…]

    AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and Influence

    AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and InfluenceHow can analysts in non-traditional, freemium, analyst firms prove their value, and how should analyst relations professionals respond to their growing impact? Until analysts start to track their impact in the fullest way, they will always be underestimated by suppliers in the high technology and telecommunications industries. Back in 2015, when this was posted, Edelman’s Read more about AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and Influence[…]

    Investor relations head takes over AR at Tata

    Investor relations head takes over AR at TataThe IIAR is discussing a big surprise: one of the big 3 IT services brands just put its analyst relations (AR) under the control of its head of investor relations (IR). It would be unimaginable in most firms, and perhaps Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) is one of the few firms that can do that well. Tata Sons’ Read more about Investor relations head takes over AR at Tata[…]

    Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research Director

    Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research DirectorLONDON. February 1st 2018 — Longtime industry analyst Peter O’Neill has been appointed Research Director by Kea Company, the world’s largest analyst relations (AR) consultancy. O’Neill was previous research director at Forrester Research, leading the firm’s services for analyst relations professionals as well as research for B2B Marketing professionals.   At Kea Company, O’Neill will Read more about Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research Director[…]

    AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention

    AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s AttentionBarbara French’s Grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention: 3 Secrets & 4 Tips helps companies to avoid some of the most common errors in analyst relations. We especially appreciated these points in the article. Marketers can use analysts and analyst research to add credibility to their businesses without ever having the analyst specifically endorse their company. Read more about AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention[…]
  • Advertisements

Why is it that more analyst blogging is better?

This morning I got an interesting tweet from Forrester analyst John Rymer (bio, Twitter handle): 

            “@carterlusher why is more analysts blogging better?”

icon-social-media-blue.jpgJohn was responding to my reply to a comment (“Good news, Gartner is allowing analysts to blog @carterlusher will be thrilled”) by Forrester analyst Jeremiah Owyang (bio, blog, Twitter handle).  This comment pointed out Gartner analyst Gene Phifer’s (bio, blog, Twitter handle) post about how Gartner analysts are now permitted to have a personal-branded blog. I don’t know if I was thrilled, but I did say “Excellent, the more analysts blogging the better.” Thus, John’s question.

Hmm, that is a good question. My initial thought was “well of course it’s better because blogging is good.” It took me about two seconds to discard that answer as glib and dumb. The real answer is twofold: blogging is a good tool for the analyst and it provides value to the overall analyst ecosystem.* There are many posts by blogging analysts on how they find their blogs useful, so I will concentrate on the value to the analyst ecosystem.

There is the perception that analysts at the largest firms and boutiques are insular because they are in an echo chamber, talking only to their own clients and the vendors they choose for briefings. There is also a sense from comments like “And who keeps the analysts in check?!?” (see comments on this post) that analysts run amok because they are not subjected to any form of third-party critique and fact checking. Blogging could potentially address both issues. Potentially, analyst blogging could result in:

  • Increasing accountability
  • Improving transparency
  • Engaging with non-clients
  • Developing new information inputs
  • Dialoging with other analysts, including competitors
  • Improving press quote accuracy

* Definition – Analyst Ecosystem – Anybody in the IT and telecommunications markets that interact with or are impacted by the industry analysts. Members include vendors, IT managers, financial analysts, reporters, investors, clients and the analysts themselves.

Bottom Line: There is no guarantee that any of the potential benefits will occur just because more analysts start blogging. However, blogging can address some nagging problems in the analyst industry and has potential benefit both for the analysts and the entire ecosystem.

Question: Are there other benefits to the analyst ecosystem from analysts blogging?

Advertisements

5 Responses

  1. […] shared, confirmation of existing premises, or new ideas can start to form, or at least that’s my answer to Carter’s question. Please take the time to welcome Gartner’s analysts to the conversation, I look forward to […]

  2. […] déjà … on Got a problem analyst? Screami…Welcome Gartner Anal… on Why is it that more analyst bl…Why is it that more … on When hype can go overboard and…Why is it that more … […]

  3. the choice of blogging or not is more than about “gatekeepers.” We at In-Stat don’t have any company policy on blogging that I know of, but we have chosen not to waste our time with it. We have no “gatekeeper” here at In-Stat, and I am always happy to answer anyone’s questions or discuss any market with anyone (customer or not) via e-mail, phone, or any other means.

    I’m happy for the Gartner analysts that have finally had their gag-order lifted, and I hope it works out for them, but there are lots of other analysts that have speaking out for years and who don’t happen to spend their time blogging.

  4. HI Allen, Thanks for the comment.

    SageCircle has consistently said that blogging and other social media are just another form of communication, good for some activities and bad for others. It’s all a matter of how it is used.

    Obviously with so few analyst blogging, most of your peers agree with your position. It will be interesting to see how this evolves over time.

  5. Thanks for taking my serious question seriously, Carter. I hear you about the downside of this industry analyst work. But I don’t think blogging alone is the antidote. What I’ve seen in analyst blogs suggests to me that a) analysts who blog just as likely to make capricious or even ignorant comment as those who don’t and b) there’s no “checks and balances” on papdoodle in analyst blogs because so few people read the things. Alas, personal integrity reinforced by regular whippings by clients seems to be all we can hope for.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: