• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

Kudos for the Oracle AR about analyst support at OpenWorld

Nice gesture by Forrester’s Merv Adrian (bio, Twitter handle, no blog) to give a shout out to the Oracle AR team.

There is also a serious message here for all AR teams planning an analyst event — don’t try and cut off the analysts from the Internet. While you might want them to completely focus on your speakers, the reality is that most people today multi-task. If your content is compelling enough then they will only be checking email occasionally for peace-of-mind. If all the analysts are doing a lot of emails then perhaps the problem is with the agenda or the content, not the fact that there is wireless in the room.

7 Responses

  1. Well said, Carter. Analysts often want to look at vendors’ websites when they speak to grab a detail about what they’re discussing, or to see if the comments are reflected accurately there, or to compare to what a competitor is doing…you get the idea. And in big rooms, they may be collaborating in real time with their colleagues for a broader view – I personally often IM with other analysts during events. It’s better than talking, because it’s less disruptive.

  2. Merv, Thanks for the comment.

    Very practical and sensible reasons why ‘net access is in vendors best interest.

  3. Yes, wireless is nice–actually, I should make a point of saying WORKING wireless is nice–but I’m still amazed at how many vendor analyst events I attend where the AR group hasn’t thought to run powerstrips to the analyst tables. Even with two batteries my laptop won’t run forever, and I then revert to taking handwritten notes. However, I have to tell you, what’s in the handwritten notes never makes it to my knowledge base, since I never get around to typing in my handwritten notes. So when I go back to my notes several months later, for all intents and purposes, the meeting ended when my batteries died.

  4. Hi Guy, Thanks for the comments.

    Sometimes it is something as humble as a powerstrip that makes a critical difference in the success of an event.

  5. From Redmonk’s James Governor, via Twitter:

    monkchips: @carterlusher even more important though- Don’t Make Everything NDA. its called a briefing for a reason. control freakery is not helpful

    monkchips: @carterlusher for vendor briefings wireless, wireless and wireless again. without it a conversation with the market is next to impossible

  6. From Freeform Dynamics’ Martin Atherton via Twitter:

    martinatherton: @carterlusher: wireless. fact of life is that analysts rarely stop working even in sessions. want total focus? do v short sessions!

  7. From Michael O’Malley, VMware’s Director, Analyst Relations & Market Intelligence, via email:

    Hi Carter –

    One of the things we learned at VMworld 2008 was that you need a contingency plan for everything – even wireless coverage! One journalist noted this in a story:

    “But what the journalists and analysts seemed to appreciate the most was something so simple, and yet so many trade shows are missing it: an ample supply of Ethernet cables (wireless connectivity was spotty at best) and power strips as well as several printers at the ready. Such a small thing, and yet it demonstrated an understanding of what is needed for people to get their jobs done.”

    9/19/08 ServerWatch: It’s the Economy, Stupid
    http://www.serverwatch.com/news/article.php/3772781

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: