• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

The Volume of Analyst Publishing and Quotes

In the “Metrics – Written Word Audits” section of the Online SageContentTM Library we recommended that AR establish a multi-faceted program to capture and analyze analyst opinions – in as near real-time as practical. This is easier said than done because the sheer volume of research and quotes being generated is growing as new forms of publishing opinion (e.g., blogs and Twitter) are added to the traditional methods. 

While browsing some research, it becomes quickly apparent that there is a huge range of research documents, not all of which need to be monitored by AR. Some research is teeming with opinions that could sway technology buyers, while other research merely provides simple product or market descriptions. Length does not correlate to volume of opinions; single page flashes can present more opinions on multiple vendors, multiple products, and markets than a 30-page report.

Blogs and Twitter add new complexity to analyst opinion monitoring:

  • Finding where the analyst is publishing – analysts can set up personal blog or Twitter accounts not associated with their firms
  • Handling an unpredictable volume – analysts usually publish a few research notes per month, but could have dozens of blog posts and many Twitter tweets one month, nearly no activity the following month, and then dozens of posts the month afterward
  • Knowing when something is published to a blog or Twitter – formal research notes typically require vendor review which alerts AR to pending important research publication. Blogs and tweets are outside the editorial/vendor review process which means that AR will not get a heads up about an important post
  • Documenting perception – There is a need to modify the tonality criteria for tagging analyst opinion so that the more freewheeling language and style of blog posts does not overwhelm the more staid research notes

SageCircle Technique:

  • Do not be discouraged. Though the numbers can seem large, the payback for knowing what the analysts are saying and writing about your company on a daily basis can be very important for both operational and strategic reasons
  • Consistent focus is key; you can get behind quickly if you are not capturing this data on a daily basis
  • Develop standards for what information to capture and how to capture it, in order to make the process as mechanical and efficient as possible
  • Use automation to ease the work of storing and analyzing the data
  • Whenever possible, out-task the activity of capturing the data

Bottom Line: It is critically important for IT and telecom vendors to monitor analyst published research and press quotes as part of an overall opinion-monitoring program. However, AR needs to carefully plan how this activity will be accomplished since the sheer number of items to monitor can overload the resources of even well-staffed programs.

Question: How do you handle analyst opinion monitoring today? Do you feel you have a handle on the task or do you feel overwhelmed?

2 Responses

  1. Does AR use any monitoring services to catch mention of their firms and products from research firms and online publishers, and if so which monitoring services are preferred?

  2. […] is Essential Posted on December 18, 2008 by sagecircle As pointed out in past posts (see The Volume of Analyst Publishing and Quotes), analyst opinions show up in published format thousands of times each month. Unfortunately, too […]

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