• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Webinar: Survey shows new risks for analyst relations

    Webinar: Survey shows new risks for analyst relations

    A first glance at the Analyst Value Survey shows new risks emerging for analyst relations professionals. We’re hosting a webinar on November 30 to hear how leading AR professionals are responding to them, and what the best practice is for your analyst relations program. Three risks stand out massively. First, there a big gap between the firms that vendors think […]

    Vendors’ five key thoughts about analyst firms

    Vendors’ five key thoughts about analyst firms

    Five things stand out from vendors’ responses to a survey we conducted after our Analyst Relations roundtable at the English Speaking Union. Analysts (including analysts who call themselves consultants or advisors) are often thought to have bias, especially if most of their revenue comes from vendors. Sometimes the effort put into staying informed makes analysts seem very process-driven but less […]

    Join us for the Forum in San José on November 17

    Join us for the Forum in San José on November 17

    Should someone you know be at the year’s most important discussion on analyst relations? We’ll be at the free ARchitect User Forum 2016 in San José, CA, on November 17. Professionals from industry leaders will introduce the sessions: Lopez Research, Digital transformation; IBM, AR in large organizations; Cognizant, Managing analyst events;  Capgemini, AR knowledge management; Wipro, Intelligence-driven relationships; and ARinsights, AR […]

    Take the 2016/17 Analyst Value Survey

    Take the 2016/17 Analyst Value Survey

    The Analyst Value Survey is open! Each year several hundred users of analyst research tell us which analyst firms they use, and which are most valuable. In exchange, they get access to our results webinar, where they discover which firms are delivering the most value in key market segments. You can take part too. Go to AnalystValueSurvey.com and click on […]

    Guess Who’s Looking for Top Talent in Analyst Relations?

    Guess Who’s Looking for Top Talent in Analyst Relations?

    Looking for a new direction in your Analyst Relations career? October is a time when new opportunities pop up in the field. From IBM to Google, we gathered the top US Analyst Relations firms with vacancies needing to be filled. If you’d like to learn more about the opportunity and to schedule an interview, contact these firms directly. However, if […]

Take a deep breath before responding to analyst commentary

Almost every week, SageCircle strategists do inquiries about how to respond to an analyst quote in the press or a piece of published research. Most often, the AR staffer is more than annoyed because the analyst’s words have caused a brouhaha with his or her management. Sometimes the AR staffer is so angry that he or she wants to call the analyst’s manager – or CEO – and complain, or put out a press release about the analyst’s shortcomings. While this could be satisfying emotionally, frankly it would be counterproductive. 

Rather than attacking the analyst by putting out a press release or talking to his or her manager, AR is better served by taking a deep breath, analyzing the situation, and developing a campaign to change the analyst’s opinion. Unfortunately, implementing a campaign to change an analyst’s opinion takes time and your executives probably want something done today. Consequently, one of AR’s challenges in this situation is how to manage the expectations of executives and colleagues who want immediate action.

SageCircle can help AR teams with managing executive expectations about changing analyst opinion. We have Executive Briefings designed to get execs to an “ah, ha!” moment about the analysts and their culture. Reaching this “ah, ha!” moment then gives AR the ability to rationally lay out a plan for changing an analyst’s opinion – or deciding to ignore them – and obtain executive buy-in.

Bottom Line: Not attacking the analyst could pay off in company sales. Because analysts talk to your prospects or potential prospects on a daily basis, an annoyed analyst has the opportunity to steer potential buyers to your competitors – and you would never know. On the other hand, a well-executed campaign to change an analyst’s opinion could result in more leads being generated for your company because a better-educated analyst would be more comfortable putting your company on appropriate short lists.

Question: How do you deal with problem analysts?  Have you had the opportunity to “train” your executives on the importance of written commentary as compared to the spoken word?

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One Response

  1. […] Take a deep breath before responding to analyst commentary « SageCircle Blog – Carter Lusher on how vendors react when analysts say things that they don't like: "Sometimes the AR staffer is so angry that he or she wants to call the analyst’s manager and complain, or put out a press release about the analyst’s shortcomings." Since I have no manager, they resort to verbally accosting me at conferences, sending emails accusing me of bias, and writing patronizing blog posts directed at me. Same impact, guys. As Carter points out, "an annoyed analyst has the opportunity to steer potential buyers to your competitors – and you would never know". That's not a threat, it's just the reality: if a vendor treats me badly, I have to assume that they'll show the same level of disrespect for their customers. […]

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