• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

Creating an Analyst Editorial Calendar

Analyst Relations PlanningAnalyst relations (AR) teams that are building their AR Strategic & Tactical Plan need to have insights into what critical analysts are planning to publish over the next few months. Knowing what an analyst is going to publish is an important planning trigger that helps AR teams be analyst centric, not company centric.

In other posts (see Responding to Analysts’ Published Comments – Speed is Essential), we have discussed responding to analyst research or rebutting their positions. An unfortunate fact is that once analysts have publicly taken a stand on a subject, getting them to change is much more difficult. On the other hand, if you start working with the analysts early in their research process, before anything has been published, it is much easier to influence the outcome and perhaps eliminate the need to rebut something that already has been printed.

An important tool for knowing what the analysts are working on is the Analyst Editorial Calendar.

An Analyst Editorial Calendar is a listing of anticipated analyst research report publication dates. Because analyst firms typically do not publish formal and complete editorial calendars, comprehensive Analyst Editorial Calendars have to be built by the core AR team. To create an Analyst Editorial Calendar, AR teams attempt to map out all the happenings that could trigger analyst research reports, presentations, or quotes onto one calendar

Once you have created the Analyst Editorial Calendar, you can link it into your AR team’s overall AR Program Calendar to build effective communications around publication dates for maximum research impact. The Analyst Editorial Calendar requires frequent updates because analysts often make changes to what they are writing depending on developments in the marketplace or in response to hot inquiries from clients.  Stay on top of these changes by asking analysts about their research publishing schedules during your regular interactions with them. 

SageCircle has best practices, example process, SageToolTM and phone-based advice available to help AR teams create an analyst editorial calendar. For example, Online SageContentTM Library clients can look up “Analyst Editorial Calendars.” To learn more about how SageCircle can help you be more efficient and effective, please contact us at 503-636-1500 or info [at] sagecircle dot com.

SageCircle Technique:

  • Decide a tool for storing the calendar information
  • Use a variety of intelligence sources to populate the calendar
    • Analyst firms’ partial editorial calendars (e.g., Forrester, Gartner and Yankee)
    • Client inquiries
    • Informal analyst conversations by the extended AR team
    • Possible updates to recurring research publications (e.g., Forrester Waves or Gartner Magic Quadrant)
    • Upcoming conferences
    • Competitor announcements.

Bottom Line: By tracking analysts’ publishing schedules, your AR Team can create an Analyst Editorial Calendar to influence the content of research reports before final publication.

Question: Do you have an Analyst Editorial Calendar? If no, why not? If yes, how do you maintain it and what tool do you use for managing the information?

 

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