• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    AR managers are failing with consulting firms

    Reflecting the paradoxical position of many clients, Kea’s Analyst Attitude Survey also goes to a wide range of consultants who play similar roles to analysts and are often employed by analyst firms. The responses to the current survey show that consultants are generally much less happy with their relationships with AR teams than analysts are. The paradox is that as […]

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

TowerGroup is rightsizing for a changed landscape

Logo - TowerGroupThe fact that the financial services industry is changing is on the front pages of news sites and newspapers every day. Banks being closed down by regulators or acquired by other banks are shrinking the market. Other financial institutions are slamming their checkbooks shut as they try to conserve capital. This turmoil is obviously impacting technology vendors that sell software, hardware, and outsourcing to banks, insurance companies, and other financial firms. In addition to the tech vendors, this changed landscape also impacts analyst firms, especially those that focus on the financial services vertical.

A case in point is illustrated by our post TowerGroup experiences layoffs. TowerGroup specializes in the financial services vertical market so it is not surprising the market turmoil would impact it. To get the details behind the job action, SageCircle was briefed on July 14th by Bob Egan, TowerGroup’s Global Head of Research & Chief Analyst (Twitter, bio). 

TowerGroup invested heavily in the mid-2000’s to support the rapidly growing financial services market and the tech vendors that sell into that market. This worked out well with 30% annual growth in 2006 and 2007. Even when growth tapered off in 2008 and 2009, TowerGroup was doing “ok.” However, Egan said that the anticipation of an extended recovery and a shrunken set of companies meant that TowerGroup needed to proactively rightsize its operations to reflect the changing realities of the market rather than hang onto the existing strategy too long and be forced to make more drastic cuts later.

The July layoffs were based on what research services were the most relevant to clients in the current economic environment. TowerGroup then thinned certain research teams to what was thought to be the appropriate level of coverage without cutting any complete services like other firms have (e.g., Yankee Group). The sales force is being similarly resized and realigned.

However, according to Egan, TowerGroup will continue to add resources to those services that are growing (e.g., sustainability, mobility and risk management). This continued investment reflects TowerGroup’s analysis that that there will a “flight to quality,” where it can take market share from smaller competitors. This is a common tactic in a recession by relatively stronger (e.g., financials, brand, size or go-to-market resources) companies regardless of industry. This strategy is to take advantage of smaller, weaker competition hunkering down and doing deeper cuts. The tricky part for TowerGroup will be making sure that the cuts they make do not significantly impact the ability to deliver the acceptable level of client service, that their investments truly address growing needs in prospects and clients, and that the sales force can effectively communicate the changes to reassure prospects and clients coming up for renewal. While all three of these tasks are not easy, the most difficult one will be preparing the the sales force with the messaging, training and supporting marketing content to convince prospects that TowerGroup is truly “quality” even after the cuts.

Bottom Line: During recessions, analyst firms like other companies make adjustments to their business models and staff. What occurred at TowerGroup is not atypical. Research consumers will need to review the changes at TowerGroup to determine how the changes impact how they get information from the remaining analysts. For vendor AR teams, the changes at TowerGroup should flow through their analyst lists, interactions calendars, and investment decisions.

2 Responses

  1. […] This earnings call should be interesting in the wake of yet more analyst firm layoffs (see TowerGroup is rightsizing for a changed landscape and Listing of analyst firms who have laid off analysts […]

  2. From the analyst overview on Tower’s website I concluded that Ted Iacubuzio (payments) was also let go. I don’t see him on your list.

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: