• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Fersht: some IIAR award-winners “just tick the boxes”

    Some of the firms mentioned by the IIAR’s analyst team awards fall short of excellence. That’s the verdict of several hundred analysts who took our Analyst Attitude Survey, and of the CEO of one of the top analyst firms. Phil Fersht left the comment below on our criticism of the IIAR awards. We thought we’d reprint it together with the […]

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    Do the IIAR awards simply reward large firms?

    The 2016 Institute for Industry Analyst Relations’ awards seem to be rewarding firms for the scale of their analyst relations, rather than their quality. In a blog post on July 6th, the IIAR awarded IBM the status of best analyst relations teams, with Cisco, Dell and HP as runners-up. Together with Microsoft, which outsources much of its analyst relations to […]

    Unmaking fruit salad: 6 ways to help analysts segment markets

    Unmaking fruit salad: 6 ways to help analysts segment markets

     It’s a common challenge for providers: some new or fast-changing market contains very different solutions. Clients want either apples or oranges, but the analyst research reads more like fruit salad. As new solutions come into old markets, or as analysts try to squeeze hot new solutions into their less-exciting coverage areas, it’s increasingly hard for users of analyst research to make […]

    Control in Analyst Attitude Surveys

    Control in Analyst Attitude Surveys

    Because a lot of analysts take part in our Analyst Attitude Surveys, we are able to offer clients what we call a control group. In the language of research, a control group is a group of people who don’t get the treatment that we want to measure the effectiveness of. For example, most firms might be focussed on a top tier […]

    Time for a new direction in AR measurement?

    Time for a new direction in AR measurement?

    Worldwide, Analyst Relations teams are committed to fostering the best information exchange, experiences and trusted relationships with tightly-targetted global industry analysts and influencers. Sometimes the targeting is too narrow and analysts are treated inhumanly. However, the technology buying process is transforming and so must the benchmarking of analyst relationships. There’s already a long-term transformation of analyst relations. Over one-third of technology […]

The Top 5: Roadshow Readiness Mistakes

Analyst Relations PlanningEven in the 21st Century with telepresence and social media, sometimes it is very useful to hit the road and meet analysts in person. Unfortunately these are expensive exercises so analyst relations (AR) teams need to be aware of the following top mistakes when it comes to road shows.

5) Not picking the right individuals to brief. Too often IT vendors waste precious time briefing analysts that have little ability to support the goals of the vendor.  While it is fine to add secondary analysts the focus must be on the most relevant to your revenues

4) Preparing a “one size fits all” presentation rather than tailoring presentations to the individual and type of analyst firm being briefed.  Analysts need to feel that you have taken the time to address their specific interests.

3) Having the wrong orientation, i.e., wanting to perform a data dump of speeds and feeds on the analyst instead of engaging in dialog and relationship building.  Moving from a company-centric approach to an analyst-centric orientation means you are more likely to address the analyst research needs.

2) Not practicing sufficiently, insufficient practice, and not planning the appropriate time to practice.

…and the number one worst mistake is

1) Not starting early enough. We have established roadshow preparation checklists that start eight weeks in advance of the roadshow. These checklists are set up to accomplish tasks in a less pressured environment and provide sufficient time for review, fine tuning, and practice.

SageCircle Technique:

  • Start early – include your roadshows for next year in the AR plan you are working on today
  • Be clear about your goals for each roadshow
  • Structure the roadshow to achieve those goals
  • Make certain that you get the analysts you really want and not “fill in” with less relevant analysts
  • Conduct phone inquiries before and after the roadshow to gather advance intelligence, manage expectations, and measure success
  • Ruthlessly drive value

Bottom Line: Roadshows can be incredibly useful or dreadfully painful failures. There is only one way to ensure success and that is for AR to start months in advance and drive the process from beginning to end. Because roadshows for IT and telecommunications analysts are so expensive in time, money, executive bandwidth, and political capital, AR teams should work to avoid these top five mistakes.

SageCircle clients can find roadshow execution checklists in the Online SageContent™ Library. We also recommend that Advisory clients schedule inquiries with a strategist to review your plan, act as a sounding board, and critique content.

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