• Recent Posts: Influencer Relations

    Why KCG’s analyst relations awards beat the IIAR’s

    Why KCG’s analyst relations awards beat the IIAR’s

    We used 18,777 data points from the Analyst Attitude Survey to compare the two leading awards for analyst relations teams. Although we found that KCG‘s awards are more useful than the IIAR‘s, both primarily reflect corporate performance rather than that of the AR teams. As a result, there’s very little that AR teams can do better or worse in these […]

    Netscout continues unwise Gartner suit

    Netscout continues unwise Gartner suit

    Netscout and Gartner have scheduled their trial for next July. The case stands little chance of improving Netscout’s value. It does, however, risk harming the reputation of both analyst firms and analyst relations professionals. Over the last weeks, pressure has mounted on Netscout’s lawyers. Netscout claims Gartner’s Magic Quadrant harmed its enterprise sales and that the truth of Gartner’s statements […]

    Is this how the Quadrant lost its Magic?

    Is this how the Quadrant lost its Magic?

    Gartner’s Magic Quadrant is the most influential non-financial business research document. In the late 1980s, it was a quick and dirty stalking horse to provoke discussions. Today it is an extensive and yet highly limited process, based on the quantification of opinions which are highly qualitative. The early evolution of the MQ tells us a lot about the challenge of industry […]

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    Saying farewell to David Bradshaw

    A funeral and celebration for David Bradshaw (shown left in this 2000 Ovum awayday photo, arm raised, with me and other colleagues) is to take place at West Norwood Crematorium, London SE27 at 2.45pm on Tuesday 23rd August and after at the Amba Hotel above London’s Charing Cross Station, on the Strand. David considered that that Ovum in that incarnation was […]

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw 1953-2016

    David Bradshaw, one of the colleagues I worked with during my time as an analyst at Ovum, died on August 11. He led Cloud research in Europe for IDC, whose statement is below. David played a unique role at Ovum, bridging its telecoms and IT groups in the late 1990s by looking at computer-telecoms integration areas like CRM, which I […]

The Top 5: Roadshow Readiness Mistakes

Analyst Relations PlanningEven in the 21st Century with telepresence and social media, sometimes it is very useful to hit the road and meet analysts in person. Unfortunately these are expensive exercises so analyst relations (AR) teams need to be aware of the following top mistakes when it comes to road shows.

5) Not picking the right individuals to brief. Too often IT vendors waste precious time briefing analysts that have little ability to support the goals of the vendor.  While it is fine to add secondary analysts the focus must be on the most relevant to your revenues

4) Preparing a “one size fits all” presentation rather than tailoring presentations to the individual and type of analyst firm being briefed.  Analysts need to feel that you have taken the time to address their specific interests.

3) Having the wrong orientation, i.e., wanting to perform a data dump of speeds and feeds on the analyst instead of engaging in dialog and relationship building.  Moving from a company-centric approach to an analyst-centric orientation means you are more likely to address the analyst research needs.

2) Not practicing sufficiently, insufficient practice, and not planning the appropriate time to practice.

…and the number one worst mistake is

1) Not starting early enough. We have established roadshow preparation checklists that start eight weeks in advance of the roadshow. These checklists are set up to accomplish tasks in a less pressured environment and provide sufficient time for review, fine tuning, and practice.

SageCircle Technique:

  • Start early – include your roadshows for next year in the AR plan you are working on today
  • Be clear about your goals for each roadshow
  • Structure the roadshow to achieve those goals
  • Make certain that you get the analysts you really want and not “fill in” with less relevant analysts
  • Conduct phone inquiries before and after the roadshow to gather advance intelligence, manage expectations, and measure success
  • Ruthlessly drive value

Bottom Line: Roadshows can be incredibly useful or dreadfully painful failures. There is only one way to ensure success and that is for AR to start months in advance and drive the process from beginning to end. Because roadshows for IT and telecommunications analysts are so expensive in time, money, executive bandwidth, and political capital, AR teams should work to avoid these top five mistakes.

SageCircle clients can find roadshow execution checklists in the Online SageContent™ Library. We also recommend that Advisory clients schedule inquiries with a strategist to review your plan, act as a sounding board, and critique content.

%d bloggers like this: