• Recent Posts: Kea's research blog

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The evolution of the IT analyst industry – a fireside chat

Focusing on the IT analyst business, its beginnings and weaknesses in the original model bringing technology and business together over the course of the last 20 years.

Panelists: Jonathan Yarmis with Gideon Gartner and Carter Lusher

Click here or on the graphic to play the video

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Carter interviewed on John Simonds’ AR podcast about the state of AR

icon-microphone-reduced-v-2.jpgIBM AR manager extraordinaire John Simonds (Twitter handle) interviewed Carter for his podcast series about AR that he posts on his  “Delusions of Adequacy” blog.  Topics we discussed were:

  • What is the state of A/R right now?
  • What is a good A/R practice/best practice?
  • What is a bad A/R practice or incident that we can learn from (without names)?
  • What could the A/R industry do to improve?

For the good and bad AR practices questions Carter looked at  both an AR practitioner practice and an AR management practice.

It was a fun and interesting discussion. Please visit  Podcast: An Analyst’s View of Analyst Relations – Carter Lusher of SageCircle to hear the interview.

Analysts who blog versus Bloggers who analyze

icon-social-media-blue.jpgBy Carter Lusher, Strategist

Last week’s Forrester Analyst Relations Council Panel on “Analyst Relations 2.0” was fun and interesting. There was quite a bit of diversity of opinion on the panel with KCG’s Bill Hopkins playing the self-described anti-blog/anti-Web 2.0 curmudgeon and Dana Gardner from Interarbor Solutions way on the other side playing the pro-social media fan. That left plenty of room in the middle for Jonathan Eunice from Illuminata, Forrester Senior Analyst James Kobielus and me to take a balanced approach. The moderator was Forrester VP Laura Ramos, who I count as a blog skeptic when it comes to blogging by analysts and vendors.

There was a fair amount of angst in the audience, with many AR professionals clearly wishing blogs would just go away, while others were open minded. Very few AR pros in attendence had embraced blogs personally or professionally. Many were clearly overwhelmed because of the sheer number and types of bloggers who could touch their companies.

While fun, there some something unsatisfying about the panel. One attendee e-mailed: “What struck me about the panel was it asked more questions than offering answers.” Hmm, good point. I tried to provide very specific advice (see Steps for AR teams for starting with analyst blogs), but I admit there was a lot of philosophical ramblings during the 100+ minutes of the panel. Upon reflection, I think the problem was that the panel was not asked to focus on a specific issue, rather we were given a topic that provoked entertaining discussion, but was too broad and fuzzy for hard recommendations.

Bowl of Spaghetti

Because “AR 2.0” was clearly too broad, the organizer and moderator decided to narrow the discussion to “analyst blogs.” However, ever this re-definition of the panel topic was too broad because it encompassed the entire blogosphere. This led to panel discussion, audience questions and comments that touched on traditional analysts and bloggers without distinguishing between the type of influencer. In addition, the discussion occasionally drifted into whether AR teams and their companies should blog and Continue reading