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  • Recent Posts: Kea SageCircle

    AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and Influence

    AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and InfluenceHow can analysts in non-traditional, freemium, analyst firms prove their value, and how should analyst relations professionals respond to their growing impact? Until analysts start to track their impact in the fullest way, they will always be underestimated by suppliers in the high technology and telecommunications industries. Back in 2015, when this was posted, Edelman’s Read more about AR Classics: Identifying and Measuring Impact and Influence[…]

    Investor relations head takes over AR at Tata

    Investor relations head takes over AR at TataThe IIAR is discussing a big surprise: one of the big 3 IT services brands just put its analyst relations (AR) under the control of its head of investor relations (IR). It would be unimaginable in most firms, and perhaps Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) is one of the few firms that can do that well. Tata Sons’ Read more about Investor relations head takes over AR at Tata[…]

    Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research Director

    Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research DirectorLONDON. February 1st 2018 — Longtime industry analyst Peter O’Neill has been appointed Research Director by Kea Company, the world’s largest analyst relations (AR) consultancy. O’Neill was previous research director at Forrester Research, leading the firm’s services for analyst relations professionals as well as research for B2B Marketing professionals.   At Kea Company, O’Neill will Read more about Peter O’Neill joins Kea Company as Research Director[…]

    AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention

    AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s AttentionBarbara French’s Grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention: 3 Secrets & 4 Tips helps companies to avoid some of the most common errors in analyst relations. We especially appreciated these points in the article. Marketers can use analysts and analyst research to add credibility to their businesses without ever having the analyst specifically endorse their company. Read more about AR Classics: Barbara French on how to grab an Influential Analyst’s Attention[…]

    What research users can learn from analysts’ use of competitors’ analysis

    What research users can learn from analysts’ use of competitors’ analysisFor the first time, Kea Company is making reports from our Leaders Service generally available. The first discusses what research users can learn from analysts’ use of competitors’ analysis Although our Analyst Value Survey reports and Firm Awards exclude many analysts’ responses, this supplementary analysis suggests that many analysts are regular uses of research produced by Read more about What research users can learn from analysts’ use of competitors’ analysis[…]

Why AR Matters – Analysts can get your company on short lists that you were excluded from

icon-dollar-euro.jpgMost analyst relations (AR) professionals are in an environment where they have to continually justify the relevance of the industry analysts and AR. One of the best arguments for justifying the investment in AR is the impact analysts have on the company’s sales opportunities. Usually the easiest to find examples are negative, such as when an analyst’s commentary has caused a vendor to be removed or excluded from a short list, because a sales rep will be howling in anger. However, with some investigation AR can turn up positive impacts of the analysts, e.g., when an analyst has been your advocate by getting your company onto a short list.

In Reality Check: Sales reps matter more than product on the Software Insider blog, former Forrester analyst and current VP of Research at SSPA John Ragsdale illustrates how an analyst with a simple question can help a vendor get placement on a vendor short list. 

“…Over the last year I have become increasingly aware of something and wanted to share it with a larger audience. When I have conversations with companies about a pending software purchase (usually CRM or eService), they tell me the core business problems they are trying to solve, then give me the list of vendors they are considering. And almost every time, I hear a little jingle from Sesame Street in my head:

     “One of these things is not like the other
     One of these things just doesn’t belong
     Can you guess which thing is not like the other
     By the time I finish this song?

“Why? Because the obvious vendor(s) who are specialists in their problem are not on the list, and they are selecting from a group of vendors who all do something else. So I ask, “Um, why isn’t Vendor X on the list?” And here is the universal reply. ‘Oh, we started with them, but Continue reading

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